Our beautiful surroundings...

We are very lucky to be located in the heart of the beautiful and world-renowned Wimbledon Village. With its wide range of boutique shops, friendly bars and quality restaurants, this is a place to spend days – and nights – relaxing and exploring.

Offering the very best of town and country, everything is within easy reach, with world-class attractions all just a short stroll away. This is the place where sporting history is made year-after-year; where nature flourishes – within just a hair’s breadth of Central London; where historic houses and gardens reveal insights into great family dynasties and household fashions from a golden era; a place where we feel privileged to ride every single time we sit in the saddle.

Find out why this is such a special place to live, visit and enjoy.

WIMBLEDON VILLAGEThe Village has a blend of chic shops, cafes and bars and its semi rural setting amongst handsome period buildings and the open space of Wimbledon Common make it unique in London. Whether you are thinking of coming here to live or simply sampling the finer things in life, look at the Wimbledon Village Website as it will show you the way: from haute couture and jewellery to fine art and antiques, beauty shops and salons, many of them independently run.

If you are in need of retail therapy, some pampering or you prefer all things culinary, you will not be disappointed; cuisines from around the globe await you as well as delis and cosy coffee shops. There are also plenty of watering holes; from trendy wine bars to traditional pubs. The eat & drink section will help you choose. If you simply want to explore Wimbledon Common or follow more energetic pursuits, turn to the leisure section where you may be surprised to discover that we do have more than just our world famous tennis courts! There is something for everyone.

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Wimbledon CommonThe Commons are an area of calm and tranquility in the midst of the urban sprawls of Wimbledon, Putney and Kingston-upon-Thames in South West London. The Commons comprise about 460 hectares (1,140 acres) of countryside split between Wimbledon Common, Putney Heath and Putney Lower Common. Putney Lower Common is separated from the rest of the Common by about 1.5 miles. Approximately 360 hectares (900 acres) of the Commons are a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) and Special Area of Conservation (SAC).

The Commons consist of woodland, scrubland, heathland, and mown recreation areas and there are also nine ponds. They are the home to a wide variety of bird, animal and plant life. Being an unfenced Common, the whole area is open to the public 24 hours a day throughout the year.

The most prominent feature of the Common is, of course, the Wimbledon Windmill. There may have been windmills on the Commons since before the 17th century but the current mill was constructed in 1817 by Charles March, a local carpenter. The Windmill museum is open at various times throughout the year. Please refer to website for further information.

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Richmond ParkRichmond Park, at almost 1000 hectares (2500 acres), is the largest Royal Park in London and is home to around 650 free-roaming deer. The pastoral landscape of hills, woodlands, ponds, gardens and grasslands set amongst ancient trees offers a peaceful respite to visitors. The Park has changed little over the centuries and, although it is surrounded by human habitation, the varied landscape of hills, woodland gardens and grasslands set among ancient trees abounds in wildlife.

Richmond Park has been designated as a Site of Special Scientific Interest and a National Nature Reserve. The royal connections to this park probably go back further than any of the others, beginning with Edward (1272-1307), when the area was known as the Manor of Sheen. The name was changed to Richmond during Henry VII’s reign.

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WIMBLEDON TENNISWimbledon Lawn Tennis Museum and Tour allow visitors to explore tennis’ evolution into a multimillion-dollar professional sport played worldwide: with exciting inter-actives and audio guides in ten languages, the Museum showcases the artistry and athleticism that is modern tennis. Guided tours of the Grounds, led by the masterfully informative Blue Badge Guides and available in multiple languages (see website), give visitors an exclusive inside look at Wimbledon and the Championships. Highlights include the prestigious Centre Court, the Press Interview Room, and the Millennium Building.
To book a tour or for more information, visit www.wimbledon.com/museum or call 020 8946 6131. Tours run until 14 June and recommence on 18 July 2015 – times vary but can be found on the website. The Museum is open from 10.00am until 5.00pm from October to March, and until 5.30pm from April to September. Last entry is 30 minutes before closing.

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Wimbledon Common GOLFIn SW19, just 7 miles from Central London, is Wimbledon Common Golf Club, a challenging woodland course with award winning greens on the historic and beautiful Wimbledon Common.

All standards of golfer are welcome as are Green Fee players. Please call the Pro Shop on 020 8946 0294 for more information on our excellent lesson & mentoring packages and our newly launched Swing Studio.

WCGC is a very welcoming club, the Ladies section has doubled in size in the last four years, there’s a great Men’s Senior section, regular weekend games & matches for all members and a lively social calendar.

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Southside HouseDescribed by connoisseurs as an unforgettable experience, Southside House provides an enchantingly eccentric backdrop to the lives and loves of generations of the Pennington Mellor Munthe families. Maintained in traditional style without intrusive refurbishment and crowded with family possessions of centuries, Southside offers a wealth of fascinating family stories. Southside has associations with Queen Natalie of Serbia and her son Alexander, and the family also have mementos from the Duke of Wharton, Lady Hamilton and others.
Open three days a week from Easter Saturday to the last Sunday in September, on Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday afternoons, as well as Bank Holidays.

Guided Tours on Wednesday, Saturday, Sunday and Bank Holiday afternoons at 2.00pm, 3.00pm and 4.00pm. Gates open 20 minutes before each tour: Visitors can book and pay for tours online.
Adults £9, Students £6, Families £15

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WIMBLEDON MUSEUMWimbledon is fortunate in having had a number of influential residents throughout its history who were determined to understand and conserve its rich heritage.

At the turn of the nineteenth century the most notable of these was Richardson Evans who created The John Evelyn Club in 1903 with that express aim, naming it in honour of the seventeenth century diarist and “patron saint” of conservation. His vast collection of items relating to Wimbledon eventually overran his house so in 1916 a formal museum was established on the top floor of the Village Hall. This remains the heart of the museum today.

Since then both institutions have undergone several name changes but The Wimbledon Society and The Museum of Wimbledon remain two vibrant elements of local life.

The museum is staffed entirely by volunteers and receives no external funding – relying on donations from visitors who are fascinated by the varied collections on view and bookshop sales. It is open every weekend afternoon from 2:30pm to 5pm and also during special events.

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CANNIZARO PARK Cannizaro Park, with a history dating back to its years as part of the Duke of Cannizaro’s Estate and its transition to a public Park when Merton Borough Council adopted it in 1949, is a well loved and popular park. Its Grade II listed status is due to some of the rare and exquisite plants which are all around the park. It has some superb trees and shrubs, which are attractive to both the horticulturalists and the gardeners as well as those who visit; come for a walk or a picnic or simply to find some peace and quiet.

Cannizaro covers some 35 acres of open land on the edge of Wimbledon Common and was a private garden for about 300 years. It is only in the last 60 years has the land been open to the public.

Based around a small valley the Park has a large variety of green areas from wide open lawns to small intimate areas such as the Herb garden and tennis court garden and lovely leisurely walks through the woodlands. Formal areas have been developed with the sunken garden next to the Hotel and the Italian Garden down near the pond expressing the changing face of garden design through the years.

The design of the Park has evolved over the centuries but the plants remain the stars of the show. In the late 19th and first half of the 20th century trees and shrubs from around the world were brought to Cannizaro.

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buddhapadipa_temple_jpgThe Buddhapadipa temple was the first Thai Buddhist temple to be built in the UK. It is home to monks and nuns, but welcomes visitors of any faith to view the grounds and temple as long as they are respectful.

The grounds cover 4 acres and include an ornamental lake, a small grove, a lovely flower garden and an orchard. The Uposatha or Shrine Hall of the temple is a holy place, which is the sacred house for all Buddhist activities and ceremonies such as ordination. On the four interior walls are some masterpieces of typical Thai mural paintings to depict the Buddha’s lifetime.

The window and door frames are made of gold leaf gilded carved teak timbers and are also inlaid with coloured glass.  It is a spectacular place to visit.

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